Spring in Yellowstone National Park 2017

So, another trip to the Grand Teton and Yellowstone National Parks is over. As was the case on previous trips, our first few days were spent around Jackson Hole (Wyoming). We visited all of the our favourite locations in and around the Grand Teton National Park. The wildflower meadows at Antelope Flats were a mass of colour with Arrow-root Balsam, Mules Ears, Penstemons, Skyrockets, Lupins, Paintbrush, etc. Unfortunately, the weather and lighting conditions were less than ideal with heavy grey skies being the norm. However, the odd break in the clouds allowed strips of sunlight to make for some moody images.

The Grand Teton, Grand Teton National Park

Some time was also spent around the Gros Ventre river and camp site where we came across Western Tanagers. Adult males have a bright red face and a yellow nape, shoulder, and rump, with black upper back, wings, and tail.

Western Tanager, Grand Teton National Park

After a few days in Grand Teton we moved on to Yellowstone National Park. As is usual when we visit Yellowstone we based ourselves in West Yellowstone. The town and park were both very busy as would be expected in holiday season. The trick is to be in the park early to avoid the crowds, but also to ensure that the steam clouds rising from the rivers and thermal pools hadn’t been burnt off.

Morning Mist On Madison River

The Upper Geyser basin (location of Old Faithful) is another early morning favourite and the following image of Morning Glory Pool is a particular favourite of mine. The wooden deck around one edge of the pool helps frame one side of the pool. However, it can be a problem due to morning shadows spilling on to the pool itself. On this occasion I was lucky.

Morning Glory Pool, Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park

Some time was also spent exploring the Lower Geyser Basin area, especially the spouters and geysers such as Clepsydra.

Clepsydra Geyser, Lower Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park

We’re always on the lookout for bears as we travel around the park, and this year presented us with more sightings than usual.

Black Bear Cub, Blacktail Plateau, Yellowstone National Park

Having spent four days photographing the main park we moved across to Cooke City, which is on the south side of the park. From there we had easy access to the Beartooth Mountains.

Snowcapped Mountain, Beartooth Mountains

We spent the next 5 days high up into the Beartooth mountains.  These gave us plenty of opportunities to photograph the wild Mountain Goats that roam high up in the mountains, and the wild flowers.

As with our previous spring trips to the area we had arranged to meet up with a local wildlife photographer. He had sought out many good nesting sites for birds such as: Red-naped Woodpeckers, American Three-toed Woodpeckers, Mountain Bluebirds and Northern Flickers.

Northern Flicker Leaves Nest, Shoshone National Forest

More photos from this trip can be viewed in this gallery.

Note: I don’t allow comments on Blog pages, but am more than happy to receive your thoughts on the photos and/or the tutorials etc. Just send an email to ilyons@msn.com

Posted in Absaroka-Beartooth Wilderness Area, Beartooth Mountains, Photography, Wyoming, Yellowstone National Park | Comments Off on Spring in Yellowstone National Park 2017

Adobe releases Lightroom CC (2015.8) and Lightroom 6.8

lr-cc-logo As with most point release updates, Adobe’s goal for this release is to provide additional camera raw support, lens profile support and address bugs that were introduced in previous releases of Lightroom. There are also a few new features for CC subscribers.

 

New Feature – Reference View

This is a new view mode in the Develop Module that provides a dedicated 2-Up view that lets you place a Reference (static) photo next to an Active (editable) photo. This is helpful when making a group of images from a single event look similar. Other examples where you might use this feature are:

  • To match the look of a photo for preset creation.
  • To adjust for white balance consistency in photos.
  • To fine-tune a camera matching profile to the appearance of a camera generated JPG file.
Reference view

Reference view

There are a number of approaches to accessing the this tool, but below is probably the simplest.

  1. In Library module, drag photos you want to edit to a collection
  2. Go to the Develop Module
  3. Click on Reference View button ra Its on the Toolbar, and you may need to show the Toolbar if hidden (i.e. tap the T key)
  4. Drag your Reference Photo onto the left pane.  You can change your Reference Photo by either dragging a different image onto the left pane or using the ‘Set as Reference Photo’ context menu in the Library Module.
  5. Edit the active photo. Use the Reference Photo to guide your editing decisions.

In addition to the horizontal 2-up view it’s also possible to display the reference and active photos as vertical 2-up. It would have been useful to also include split views. May be next time.

Reference view - vertical

Reference view – vertical

In general, the tool is most useful when used to visually match photos to a reference photo. It’s also possible to adjust by the RGB values associated with pixels directly under the cursor. However, the RGB values themselves are displayed under the Histogram, which means you are constantly having to switch your view from the photo to the histogram. Personally, I find this rather tiring on the eyes, and would prefer that the RGB values are displayed at the cursor position rather than the histogram.

While above describes a work flow where the reference photos and all of the other images are from the same event it is possible to set any photo in your catalog as the reference photo.

Note that by default, Lightroom will clear the current reference photo when you switch away from the Develop module. To lock the current reference photo to the Reference window, click the Reference Photo lock icon  in the toolbar before switching away from the Develop module.

Other new features include:

  • You can now filter or create a Smart Collection for images that have Snapshots associated with them.
  • You can now export a Collection Set as a new catalog.

Other performance improvements include:

  • With Lightroom CC (2015.8) / 6.8 there are a number of  activity prioritisation changes designed to improve the responsiveness of your Lightroom experience.  As a result, you should notice improvements in photo editing responsiveness when background tasks (such as Preview Generation) are running, moving files between folders, running catalog backups, etc.
  • You can now zoom to fit and zoom to fill.  Particularly when using ultra high-resolution (i.e. 4K and 5K) monitors, prior versions of Lightroom would not completely fill the Loupe window.

New Camera and Lens Support in Lightroom CC (2015.8) / 6.8

  • Canon EOS M5
  • Fujifilm X-A3
  • Google Pixel
  • Google Pixel XL
  • Hasselblad X1D
  • Leica TL
  • Nikon D5600
  • Olympus E-M1 Mark II (*)
  • Olympus PEN E-PL8
  • Panasonic LUMIX DMC-FZ2500 (DMC-FZ2000 and DMC-FZH1)
  • Pentax K-70
  • Samsung Galaxy S7
  • Samsung Galaxy S7 Edge
  • Sony Alpha a6500 (ILCE­-6500)
  • Sony Alpha a99 II (ILCA-99M2)
  • Sony DSC-RX100 Mark V

* denotes preliminary support

Additional lens profiles have been included for: Apple, Canon, Google, Go Pro, Leica, Nikon, Ricoh, Samsung and Sigma cameras and smart phones.

New Tethered Shooting Support in Lightroom CC (2015.8) / 6.8

  • Canon EOS 5D Mark IV

Bug Fixes include:

Installation Instructions

Select Help > Updates to use the update mechanism in the Creative Cloud app.

Disclosure: As an Adobe Community Professional I receive a free subscription to Adobe Creative Cloud.

Posted in Adobe, Adobe Creative Cloud, Adobe Photoshop Lightroom, Lightroom CC, Photography | Comments Off on Adobe releases Lightroom CC (2015.8) and Lightroom 6.8

Adobe Lightroom on the Web

lr-mobile-100Lightroom on the web? Yes, there’s a web version of Lightroom.

What is it? It’s web based version of Lightroom that you access from within a web browser. You can easily access, organize, and share photos you’ve synced from Lightroom on the desktop, Lightroom mobile for devices or dragged directly into the web browser interface. Lightroom on the web also allows you to edit photos, including cropping, making adjustments, and applying presets.

If this is the first you’ve come across a web based version of Lightroom then more details can be found at Lightroom on the web.

Lightroom on the web - sign-in

Lightroom on the web – sign-in

Having signed in you’ll be greeted with a screen not unlike Lightroom mobile. The default view is Grid view (for viewing photos in collections).

Lightroom for the web - Grid View

Lightroom on the web – Grid View

On left side you’ll see all of the Collections you’ve synced, and along the top are options searching photos, adding photos, sharing photos, and displaying a slideshow. You can also apply flags or ratings in this view. Clicking on a thumbnail in Grid view opens the photo into Loupe view. Here you can switch to Edit view by clicking on a button located at top left corner of loupe view window edit_button In this view you can non destructively edit your photos.

Lightroom on the Web - Edit mode

Lightroom on the Web – Edit mode

Lightroom on the web shares many of the editing features found in Lightroom mobile, and like mobile any edits you apply will be synced back to your other devices and Lightroom desktop catalog.

Lightroom on the web - Develop Presets

Lightroom on the web – Develop Presets

 

November Updates

As of November 2016 Adobe has introduced a number of enhancements to Lightroom on the web. These are primarily focused on Sharing. For example, you can now add a header graphic, add sections within your Shares, and add text describing the sections.

Lightroom on the web - Selecting photos to share

Lightroom on the web – Selecting photos to share

If you have already tried it, then do so!

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Adobe Lightroom CC (2015.7) and Lightroom 6.7 are now available

lr-cc-logo

Adobe’s goal for this release is to provide additional camera raw support, lens profile support and address bugs that were introduced in previous releases of Lightroom. There are also some new features available to CC subscribers.

Note that this version of Lightroom on Mac requires the use of OSX 10.10 and greater.

New features for Lightroom CC Subscribers

Publish to Adobe Stock Contributor Site

You can now submit images directly from Lightroom CC to the new Adobe Stock Contributor Site using the new Adobe Stock Publish Service. As with the previous attempt (late 2000’s) by Adobe to encourage more customers to use their stock photo service I suspect this feature will be of interest to a small subset of  Lightroom users rather than the majority. Nevertheless, for those interested, it’s useful to be able to access the service from within Lightroom itself. For those who are inclined, it provides you with the opportunity to showcase your work to other customers directly inside Creative Cloud applications.

To get started contributing to Adobe Stock you need to go through a one-time on-boarding process in which you set up the 
plug-in.

Adobe Stock Set-up

Adobe Stock Set-up

You can use your Creative Cloud account to login as Adobe Stock contributor. 
Alternatively, if you already have an Adobe Stock account you can use your existing login. When you’ve completed the signup process, select Save in the Stock plug-in dialog.

SYNC ENHANCEMENTS

Avoiding Issue of Unwanted Duplicates

Unlike the traditional import process, Lightroom used to add duplicate copies of photos when the same photo was synced from Lightroom Mobile/Web even when it was already present in your Lightroom catalog. 
To avoid this issue, Lightroom now adds the photo being synced from cloud as a Virtual Copy referencing it to the original photo already present in your catalog. 
For example, say you already have a photo (IMAGE1.xyz) in your Lightroom catalog, but not in a synced collection, then decide to import the same photo into Lightroom web or Lightroom mobile. 
Previously you would have seen copy of IMAGE1.xyz added to your catalog. 
However, with the new behaviour, instead of adding the IMAGE1.xyz again, Lightroom will add a virtual copy for the photo. The following screenshot shows a mix of directly imported and synced photos with virtual copies used in place of duplicate originals for any synced photos.

Avoiding Issue of Unwanted Duplicates

Avoiding Issue of Unwanted Duplicates

Updates to ‘All Synced Photos’

Adobe have also made some changes (I’m not convinced it’s improvement though) that is intended to make it easier to access photos you’ve imported into Lightroom CC when on the go via Lightroom for mobile and/or Lightroom for web.

You can now drag images directly to the ‘All Synced Photographs’ collection in the Catalog panel. By doing so, the image syncs with the Creative Cloud, and ensures that you’ll be able to organise, edit, or share the photo across your mobile devices and Lightroom web. However, the workflow of removal or deletion of synced Photo/Collection is now somewhat more complicated. The options available are:

  • Delete a synced collection: a dialog box appears asking the users to decide whether to retain their photos in All Synced Photographs, or delete them from there as well, along with the collection deletion.
  • Remove a photo from All Synced Photographs: 
a dialog box appears informing the user about removal of the selected image in all synced collections as well.
Remove photo(s) from All Synced Collections

Remove photo(s) from All Synced Photographs

  • Remove a photo from a synced collection: 
a dialog box appears asking the user to decide on whether to remove the photo from All Synced Photographs as well as from the specific collection. 
No = Photo is removed only from the selected synced collection.
Yes = Photo is removed from the selected synced collection as well as All 
Synced Photographs (provided if the photo is not in any other synced collection).
Remove photo(s) from Synced Collection

Remove photo(s) from Synced Collection

Clicking on the ‘Don’t show again’ checkbox in above dialog boxes mean Lightroom remembers the previous setting.

Where would you use this feature?

Say you have a photo in a synced collection. This photo will also be present in the ‘All Synced Photos (as the photo was in a synced collection). If the image is present in ‘All Synced Photos’ you will have the option to work with them on other devices like Lightroom mobile and Lightroom web. Adobe do not want to limit the photo from being synced, if it was removed from a synced collection. Hence they have given you an option to allow the photo to be in sync (which means it’s present in the ‘All Synced Photos’), or not in sync (by removing it from ‘All Synced Photos’).

Smart Previews for Faster Performance

Since the introduction of Smart Previews in Lightroom 5.0 it has been possible to use Smart Previews in the Develop Module as a way to edit photos without having access to the original files on disk. However, astute users reported faster performance in the Development by using Smart Previews when keeping their original photos disconnected from their computer. Now, you can set a Preference in the Performance tab that will let Lightroom always use Smart Previews when available.

To use this feature,

  1. Choose Edit > Preferences.
  2. In the Preferences dialog, select the Performance tab.
  3. In the Develop section, select Use Smart Previews Instead Of Originals For Image Editing.
  4. Click OK and then restart Lightroom.

Note that when you zoom into a photo a 100% (1:1) Lightroom will automatically display the original file rather than the Smart Preview. This will allow you to accurately apply the appropriate amount of sharpening and noise reduction to the photo.

Use Smart Preview instead of originals for editing

Use Smart Preview instead of originals for editing

I expect to make good use of this feature during my upcoming trip to New England and Nova Scotia.

‘Display P3’ Colour Space Support

Adobe have added support for Apple’s ‘Display P3’ color space, adding it to the previous default set of color space profiles (sRGB, AdobeRGB, and Pro Photo RGB). ‘Display P3’ was added to the default color space/profile options in the following areas:

  • Export Dialog (File Settings > Color Space menu)
  • Soft Proofing (Develop Module > Soft Proofing > Profile menu)
  • Preferences (External Editing > Color Space menu)
  • Print to JPEG (Print Module > Print Job panel > Print To menu)
  • Book Module Export Options (Book Module > Book Settings Panel > Book 
popup > JPG/PDF)

New Camera Support

  • Apple iPad Pro 9.7′′ (wifi and cellular)
  • Apple iPhone 6s Plus
  • Apple iPhone 6s
  • 
Apple iPhone SE
  • Canon EOS 5D Mark IV*
  • 
Casio EX­ZR4000 (EX­ZR5000)
  • Hasselblad H6D­100c
  • Nikon D3400

*Note that this version supports the import and editing of jpegs, raw files and dual pixel raw files from this camera model. Adobe do not support any specific dual pixel raw functionality. If you are planning to use Dual Pixel raw files, please read this Adobe KB Doc. Add link

**Adobe has added new Adobe Standard colour profiles for the Canon EOS 5DS and Canon EOS 5DS R cameras. These versions are denoted as V2, and the v2 profiles have lower contrast than the original Adobe Standard (v1) camera profiles.

Disclosure: As an Adobe Community Professional I receive a free subscription to Adobe Creative Cloud.

Posted in Adobe, Adobe Creative Cloud, Adobe Photoshop Lightroom, Adobe Stock, Apple, Lightroom CC, Lightroom mobile, Lightroom Web, Photography | Comments Off on Adobe Lightroom CC (2015.7) and Lightroom 6.7 are now available