Lightroom CC (2015.7) and Lightroom 6.7 are now available

lr-cc-logo

Adobe’s goal for this release is to provide additional camera raw support, lens profile support and address bugs that were introduced in previous releases of Lightroom.

Note that this version of Lightroom on Mac requires the use of OSX 10.10 and greater.

New features for Lightroom CC Subscribers

Publish to Adobe Stock Contributor Site

You can now submit images directly from Lightroom CC to the new Adobe Stock Contributor Site using the new Adobe Stock Publish Service. Submitting your photos to Adobe Stock provides you with the opportunity to showcase your work to other customers directly inside Creative Cloud applications.

To get started contributing to Adobe Stock you need to go through a one-time on-boarding process in which you set up the 
plug-in.

Adobe Stock Set-up

Adobe Stock Set-up

You can use your Creative Cloud credentials to login as Adobe Stock contributor. 
You can also use your existing Adobe Stock account, if you already have one. After the on-boarding process, select Save in the Stock plug-in dialog.

SYNC ENHANCEMENTS

Avoiding Issue of Unwanted Duplicates

Lightroom used to add duplicates copies of photos when the same photo was synced from Lightroom Mobile/Web and it was also locally present in the catalog. 
To avoid this issue, Lightroom now adds the photo being synced from cloud as a Virtual Copy referencing it to the original photo already present in your catalog. 
For example, if your Lightroom catalog has a photo (IMAGE1.xyz) in it, but not in a synced collection, then you import the same photo into Lightroom web or Lightroom mobile. 
Previously you would have seen copy of IMAGE1.xyz added to your catalog. 
However, with the new behaviour, instead of adding the IMAGE1.xyz again, Lightroom will add a virtual copy for the photo. The following screenshot shows a mix of directly imported and synced photos with virtual copies used in place of duplicate originals for any synced photos.

Avoiding Issue of Unwanted Duplicates

Avoiding Issue of Unwanted Duplicates

Updates to ‘All Synced Photos’

Adobe have also made some changes (I’m not convinced it’s improvement though) that is intended to make easier to access photos you’ve imported into Lightroom CC when on the go via Lightroom for mobile and/or Lightroom for web.

You can now drag images directly to the “All Synced Photographs” collection in the Catalog panel. By doing so, the image syncs with the Creative Cloud, and ensures that you’ll be able to organise, edit, or share the photo across your mobile devices and Lightroom web. However, the workflow of removal or deletion of synced Photo/Collection is now somewhat more complicated. The options available are:

  • Delete a synced collection: a dialog box appears asking the users to decide whether to retain their photos in All Synced Photographs, or delete them from there as well, along with the collection deletion.
  • Remove a photo from All Synced Photographs: 
a dialog box appears informing the user about removal of the selected image in all synced collections as well.
Remove photo(s) from All Synced Collections

Remove photo(s) from All Synced Photographs

  • Remove a photo from a synced collection: 
a dialog box appears asking the user to decide on whether to remove the photo from All Synced Photographs as well as from the specific collection. 
No = Photo is removed only from the selected synced collection.
Yes = Photo is removed from the selected synced collection as well as All 
Synced Photographs (provided if the photo is not in any other synced collection).
Remove photo(s) from Synced Collection

Remove photo(s) from Synced Collection

Clicking on the ‘Don’t show again’ checkbox in above dialog boxes mean Lightroom remembers the previous setting.

Where would you use this feature?

Say you have a photo in a synced collection. This photo will also be present in the ‘All Synced Photos (as the photo was in a synced collection). If the image is present in ‘All Synced Photos’ you will have the option to work with them on other devices like Lightroom mobile and Lightroom web. Adobe do not want to limit the photo from being synced, if it was removed from a synced collection. Hence they have given you an option to allow the photo to be in sync (which means it’s present in the ‘All Synced Photos’), or not in sync (by removing it from ‘All Synced Photos’).

Smart Previews for Faster Performance

Since the introduction of Smart Previews in Lightroom 5.0 it has been possible to use Smart Previews in the Develop Module as a way to edit photos without having access to the original files on disk. However, astute users reported faster performance in the Development by using Smart Previews and by keeping their original photos disconnected from their computer. Now, you can set a Preference in the Performance tab that will let Lightroom always use Smart Previews if they are available.

To do so,

  1. Choose Edit > Preferences.
  2. In the Preferences dialog, select the Performance tab.
  3. In the Develop section, select Use Smart Previews Instead Of Originals For Image Editing.
  4. Click OK and then restart Lightroom.

Note that when you zoom into a photo a 100% (1:1) Lightroom will automatically display the original file rather than the smart preview. This will allow you to accurately apply the appropriate amount of sharpening and noise reduction to the photo.

Use Smart Preview instead of originals for editing

Use Smart Preview instead of originals for editing

I expect to make good use of this feature during my upcoming trip to New England and Nova Scotia.

‘Display P3’ Colour Space Support

Adobe have added support for Apple’s ‘Display P3’ color space, adding it to the previous default set of color space profiles (sRGB, AdobeRGB, and Pro Photo RGB). ‘Display P3’ was added to the default color space/profile options in the following areas:

  • Export Dialog (File Settings > Color Space menu)
  • Soft Proofing (Develop Module > Soft Proofing > Profile menu)
  • Preferences (External Editing > Color Space menu)
  • Print to JPEG (Print Module > Print Job panel > Print To menu)
  • Book Module Export Options (Book Module > Book Settings Panel > Book 
popup > JPG/PDF)

New Camera Support

  • Apple iPad Pro 9.7′′ (wifi and cellular)
  • Apple iPhone 6s Plus
  • Apple iPhone 6s
  • 
Apple iPhone SE
  • Canon EOS 5D Mark IV*
  • 
Casio EX­ZR4000 (EX­ZR5000)
  • Hasselblad H6D­100c
  • Nikon D3400

*Note that this version supports the import and editing of jpegs, raw files and dual pixel raw files from this camera model. Adobe do not support any specific dual pixel raw functionality. If you are planning to use Dual Pixel raw files, please read this Adobe KB Doc. Add link

**Adobe has added new Adobe Standard colour profiles for the Canon EOS 5DS and Canon EOS 5DS R cameras. These versions are denoted as V2, and the v2 profiles have lower contrast than the original Adobe Standard (v1) camera profiles.

Posted in Adobe, Adobe Creative Cloud, Adobe Photoshop Lightroom, Adobe Stock, Apple, Lightroom CC, Lightroom mobile, Lightroom Web, Photography | Comments Off on Lightroom CC (2015.7) and Lightroom 6.7 are now available

Off to New England & Nova Scotia

photoventures-1

I’ll shortly be departing on a 16 day photo trip to New England and Nova Scotia. The trip will begin with a leisurely 4 day drive along the Maine coast. We hope to visit areas such as Boothby Harbour, Pemaquid Point, Stonington, Prospect Harbour and Acadia National Park. We will then follow the northern Maine coast before travelling into Canada crossing into New Brunswick then entering the Province of Nova Scotia.

map-of-nova-scotia

We expect to stay seven days in Nova Scotia and hope to explore as much of the peninsula as we can. Our first stop will be in the east as we photograph around Sydney. This will afford us the opportunity to explore the Cape Breton Highlands National Park and the wild eastern coastline of this island part of the Province. We’ll then head to Halifax to visit the central region during the day but ensuring we take every opportunity to capture the sunrise and sunsets at the famous Peggy’s Cove Lighthouse. This is the iconic location in Nova Scotia and its wild and remote location makes it one of the most recognised lighthouse on the eastern seaboard of the American Continent. From here we will continue our exploration of the Province as we head south west to photograph the coast around Weymouth and Yarmouth. This will give us the opportunity to visit the rugged coastline as well as the interior. Weather permitting and with so much wild coastline to photograph we should be in for a feast of photography.

Having completed our journey through Nova Scotia we will return to the USA through the central part of New Brunswick, crossing the border into Northern Maine. We will then cross into New Hampshire and the White Mountains enjoying the fall scenery and quaint villages before turning south back to the Maine coast.

il_131027_09704

All being well, I’ll post a few photos during the trip.

Note: I don’t allow comments on Blog pages, but am more than happy to receive your thoughts on the photos and/or the tutorials etc. Just send an email to ilyons@msn.com

Posted in Adobe Photoshop Lightroom, Canada, Maine, New Brunswick, New England, New Hampshire, Nova Scotia | Comments Off on Off to New England & Nova Scotia

Adobe release Lightroom mobile 2.4 for iOS

lr-mobile-100I normally don’t get too excited when a new version of Adobe Lightroom mobile comes along, but 2.4 is different. Why?

Well, version 2.4 includes two features that I, and I suspect many other photographers, have long been waiting for. These are Raw support  and Local Adjustments. Unfortunately, they’re only available to ‘Adobe Creative Cloud’ subscribers.

Other minor features introduced in version 2.4 that all users can avail of include:

  • support for keyboard shortcuts. This feature requires an external keyboard, and is activated by pressing down on the ‘Cmd’ key,
  • the ability to add your own copyright to photos, and
  • support for the latest Camera Raw version.

New features are all well and good, but unless instructions on how to use them are provided then users will likely struggle to understand how they work. So, taking each of the new features in turn I’ll try to explain the workflow.

Raw Support

Raw support allows you to import and edit Raw photos taken with your digital camera. These photos can then be synced back to ‘Lightroom CC’ on your desktop computer. Of course the Raw photos must first be imported onto your iPad, and it is here that things get a tad complex.

To import your Raw photos on to your iPad you’ll need to use an Apple ‘SD Camera Card Reader’ or ‘iPad Camera Connection Kit’. Depending on which version of the iPad you have you’ll need to import the Raw photos directly from the memory card or directly from your camera into the Apple Photos App ‘Camera Roll’. Either way, the SD Camera Card Reader or Camera Connection kit is essential.

Apple Photo app Import

Apple Photos App Import Camera Roll

When the Apple Photos App import process is complete you then switch to Lightroom mobile. Here you should notice that a ‘Raw’ badge overlays part of the thumbnail for each Raw photo.

Lightroom mobile - Import to 'Camera Roll' complete

Lightroom mobile – Import to ‘Camera Roll’ Complete

Next, make sure that you have enabled support for Raw photo import in Lightroom mobile. Below screen grab shows where this can be done.

Lightroom mobile - Enable Raw Photos

Lightroom mobile – Enable Raw Photos

At this point you can either select all of the imported Raw photos or a smaller number. In below example, I selected all of the Raw photos.

Lightroom mobile - Select All Raw Photos

Lightroom mobile – Select All Raw Photos

When all of the photos have been added to Lightroom mobile you’ll find that an additional badge (Lr) overlays each of the photo thumbnails.

Lightroom mobile - Completed Raw Photo Import

Lightroom mobile – Completed Raw Photo Import

If you’re satisfied that all of the Raw photos have been imported into Lightroom mobile you can delete the originals from Apple Photos App, thus saving some space on your iPad.

When an internet connection becomes available your Raw files will be synced to the Adobe Cloud and ultimately back to Lightroom desktop. If you have any other mobile devices with Lightroom mobile installed smart previews will be synced to these devices.

Local Adjustments

As with Raw support, Local Adjustments has been on my list of must have features for a very long time. In this version Adobe have chosen to include what they call Linear and Radial Selections (in Lightroom desktop these are called Graduated and Radial filters). Personally, I don’t see why Adobe didn’t stick with the names that users already know. If name changes were deemed essential then Linear and Radial Gradients are more meaningful, at least to me.

Okay, so having got my rant about naming conventions out of the way it’s time to look at each local adjustment in turn. I’ll start with the Linear Gradient, uhh, I mean Selection since it’s the default.

To activate Local Adjustments switch to Edit mode and tap on the ‘Local Adjust’ button. A new button appears on the lower left and tapping on this results in a menu popping up. It has two options at present with the top one (Linear Selection) selected by default.

Activating Local Ajustments

Activating Local Adjustments

Next, you tap on the photo where you want the centre of the gradient to be located. The width of the gradient is adjusted by dragging the top or bottom line up/down, and the centre of the gradient can be reposition by dragging the black dot up or down the screen. Additional gradients can be created by tapping on the ‘+‘ button at top left of screen, and the ‘trashcan’ is used to remove a gradient.

Local Adjustments - 'Linear Selection'

Local Adjustments – ‘Linear Selection’ Tool

Next up, the Radial Selection tool. I find this tool is particularly useful for edge burning portraits, although it has its uses in other types of photo.

Radial Selection Tool

Local Adjustments – ‘Radial Selection’ Tool

The Radial Selection tool is activated and the gradient positioned in the same way as the Linear Selection. At top left of screen you’ll see an additional button. This button allows you switch the gradient from inside the selection to outside and vice versa. To increase  the feathering (soften edge) of the gradient drag the larger handle point on the selection counterclockwise, and clockwise to to harden the edge. (Note: in above and below screen grabs the handle point is on top edge of photo.)

Local Adjustments -

Local Adjustments – Reduced Exposure Outside of Selection

Both Linear and Radial  selection tools support the full range of slider adjustments currently available in Lightroom mobile.

So, having described the two new features I was so keen to see introduced I posed myself a question –  Do I think Raw support and Local Adjustments means that Lightroom mobile is now ready for the ‘big time’? Sadly, I don’t believe so, at least not just yet. Sure, both features are very welcome and certainly make Lightroom mobile more useful to me than before. On the other hand, some photographers might have a different workflow or less demanding requirements. For example, if your iPad has sufficient space to store the imported Raw photos then leaving your laptop at home while on a short vacation might be OK. For longer holidays or large professional photo shoots I think many will likely find the iPad short of storage capacity. Also, syncing photos to the ‘Adobe Cloud’ and later Lightroom on your desktop computer means that sufficient bandwidth will be essential both on location and at home/office. This means that if you’re a professional or advanced amateur  photographer you’ll likely find that  taking a laptop on location/holiday still provides a much more productive and efficient workflow than mobile. To be fair, I don’t think the Lightroom mobile development team see it as the ‘laptop killer’ yet, but it’s certainly getting closer.

Disclosure: As an Adobe Community Professional I receive a free subscription to Adobe Creative Cloud.

Posted in Adobe, iOS, iPad, iPhone, Lightroom mobile | Comments Off on Adobe release Lightroom mobile 2.4 for iOS

Adobe Lightroom CC 2015.6 and Lightroom 6.6 Now Available

lr-cc-logoAdobe Lightroom CC 201.6 and Lightroom 6.6 where released yesterday (8 June). CC customers will find a number of new features most useful of which is Guided Upright (more below). For non CC customers this version only includes some bug fixes along with new camera and lens support. More details of the new features.bug fixes, etc can be read on the Lightroom Journal.

Guided Upright 

Adobe introduced the Upright feature in Lightroom 5 to help customers easily straighten images, fix horizons, and reduce or eliminate the keystone effect in buildings.  Given that the tool was auto only  it tends to work best when there are prominent vertical and horizontal lines in the photo. With Lightroom CC 2015.6 Adobe has included the ability to manually define the vertical and horizontal lines to be used for the Upright transform.

Use the following hints to get started.

  1. Select an photo and click on the Develop Module.
  2. Enable Lens Profile Corrections.  Upright works better with Lens Profile Corrections activated.
Updated Lens Corrections Panels in Develop Module

Updated Lens Corrections Panels in Develop Module

Note that the Upright tab has been removed from the Lens Corrections panel thus simplifying it. The new Transform panel is for all users. However, only CC customers will se the Guided Upright button. 

3. Notice that there is a new “Transform” Panel. Transform includes both Upright and the manual perspective correction sliders together in a convenient place.

New Transform Panel in Develop Module

New Transform Panel in Develop Module

The following photo is a typical example of where Guided Upright works particularly well.

Photo before applying Guided Upright

Photo before applying Guided Upright

4. Within Transform panel, click on the “Guided” button. Next draw the vertical and horizontal lines directly on the image and Upright automatically transforms the image. The maximum number of guide lines is 4. However, Upright will transform the image once you draw at least 2 guides.

Guided Upright in Action

Guided Upright in Action

If needed, fine tune the results with the manual transform sliders, including the new X and Y transform sliders.  They can be used for  repositioning/moving the image within the canvas after applying the perspective corrections to choose which part of the (warped, non-rectangular) image to show within the rectangular canvas. It’s also possible to fine tune the guide lines by clicking and dragging on the guide handles.

Fine tune transform using guide handles

Fine tune transform using guide handles

Image after applying Guided Upright

Image after applying Guided Upright

Check out this great video by Julieanne Kost to learn more about Guided Upright!

Other Improvements

  • Lightroom CC 2015.6 and 6.6 also benefit from improved louping performance in  Develop module by being smarter about anticipating which photos you’ll edit next. Basically, when you’re working in the Develop module Lightroom preloads two photos either side of the current photo. This means that when you move on, the next image will render much faster.
  • Prior to 2015.6 it was only possible to create a panorama merge when the originals were available (on-line), but now you can build a panorama if  smart previews are available. The downside being, a panorama created from smart previews will be smaller than one created from the images.

Syncing Photos with Adobe Cloud

I must admit that I’m not the greatest fan of Lightroom mobile/web. My main complaint being that syncing photos to the Adobe Cloud is all but impossible on low bandwidth internet connections. For example, prior to fibre broadband becoming available in my area the fastest upload speed I could achieve was in the order of 350kbs. Typically, it would take me an hour to upload 100 photos and another 10/15 minutes for them to become available on my iPad. The process was made even worse because there was no feedback on progress if a sync error occurred. Fortunately, I now have fibre broadband with upload speed in the order of 18mbs and download speed of just under 77mbs. Coincidently, Lightroom now includes (Lightroom CC only) an activity sync panel that provides visual feedback on sync progress. That said, why Adobe decided to include this panel within Lightroom Preferences is a head scratcher.

Pending Sync Activity Panel

Pending Sync Activity Panel

How do I update?

To update Lightroom, go to Help menu > Updates or click the Update button in the CC desktop app. Alternatively, here are the direct links to the patches: Windows – Mac

Disclosure: As an Adobe Community Professional I receive a free subscription to Adobe Creative Cloud.

Posted in Adobe Creative Cloud, Adobe Photoshop Lightroom, Lightroom 6, Lightroom CC, Lightroom mobile, Smart Previews | Comments Off on Adobe Lightroom CC 2015.6 and Lightroom 6.6 Now Available

Winter in the Canyon Gallery added

winterI’ve just uploaded a gallery of photos from my trip to USA last November/December.

The gallery can be found at Winter in the Canyons

The same gallery of photos is also available via my Flickr account.

More details on the trip can be read here

 

Posted in Arizona, Bryce Canyon, Monument Valley, Photography, USA, Utah | Comments Off on Winter in the Canyon Gallery added